What it means to be saved by faith

July 13, 2009 by admin  
Filed under Defending the Faith

butterPicMany people use the word faith. People claim to have faith or not to have faith in lots of things from baseball teams to governments, marriage and religion. When someone uses the word faith, a variety of things come to mind.

In one popular dictionary, there are at least nine shades of meaning in the current English usage of the word faith.  For example, it can be defined as a personal opinion, a religious system, a sacred promise, or even as an attitude of perseverance (as in “Keep the faith.”). We English speakers have a genius for taking a word and using it creatively. In many ways, that is what makes our language so rich and adaptable.

However, there are times when we must be very clear about what we mean. For example, when Christians use the word in a gospel sense, much hinges on the correct understanding of the term. The gospel of Jesus Christ promises forgiveness, new birth, peace of mind, life-purpose, eternal life and much more. In essence, the gospel is this: If we will turn from our destructive patterns of doing things (sin) and put our faith in Jesus Christ, we will be saved. But what exactly does it mean to put faith in Jesus Christ? The New Testament idea of faith comes from the Greek word pistis, meaning trust, reliance, conviction–faith. As the New Testament uses the word there are several facets to the meaning of pistis:

First, it is a firm conviction that Jesus is who he claimed to be in the gospel accounts and that his death on the cross paid the penalty for human sin against God.  It is an acceptance of what the gospels and the rest of the New Testament say about him.  In other words, it is a belief that the information given to us in the Bible is accurate.

Of course, there are many people who simply don’t believe these assertions are true. They deny that Jesus was deity in any sense, or that his death had any significance other than as a tragic example of injustice. Some even deny his existence. Other people do believe in Jesus as he is portrayed in the New Testament. They have come to the conviction that Jesus was unique in his dual nature as human and divine; that his death achieved atonement for sin; that he is lord over all and that to know him in a faith-sense is to be granted eternal life. This is the factual basis for faith. It is the mental response to the gospel message.

But faith moves on from a willing acknowlegement of certain biblical and theological truths to a personal choice to surrender one’s life with its willful independence, destructive behavior and violation of moral principles and  to rely on God to remake us from the inside out. In other words, it is entirely possible to know the facts about Jesus and assent to their validity, but to miss eternal life. What is lacking is a profound response to these truths. This works out as a definite choice to receive Jesus’ forgiveness and allow his benevolent ownership of our lives.

This is why a main feature of evangelistic events is to bring truth to bear on the conscience so that people come to a point of decision. Without a definite positive response to Jesus Christ, there can be no salvation. This is salvation-faith. It what God asks of us in response to what he has done in Christ. It is both emotional and volitional. That is, it is a choosing to act on what the mind accepts.

But there is still another aspect to the New Testament usage of the word faith.  Faith always results in actions and conduct consistent with the assent of the mind and the response of the will and emotions. The book of James reminds us that faith without works (actions) is dead. This is stating the rather obvious truth that we understand pretty well in other aspects of life. In a romantic relationship, if the feelings, commitments and words don’t show themselves in any sort of tangible action, the beloved would clearly have the right to question the reality of what he or she has been told. To say we believe in Jesus and never act in a way which confirms that claim, rightfully causes people around us to be highly skeptical of the validity of our faith.

In other words, faith in Jesus shows itself in visible ways.  Certain things we were in the habit of doing which are offensive to God and other people now bother us. We notice and feel uncomfortable about how we use our mouths, how we treat people, how we regard ourselves and about our attitude of flippancy toward God. There is a new desire to please God along with the beginning steps of tangible actions showing that desire. We are pleased to see the basic shape of faith appear in our lives as we act on what we have come to believe.

OK: enough explanation.  Now let’s get practical: does this describe you? Perhaps you don’t know enough yet to have a well-rounded theological faith, but at least you believe that Jesus is the Son of God and that he died for you, rising again from the grave. You have moved on from what you know about Jesus to a response of gratitude and a willing reception of what he has done. Your life is now showing the beginnings of real change on a number of levels. This is biblical faith, saving faith. There is nothing on earth like it.  I highly recommend it!

Michael Bogart

Opinions About God

April 13, 2009 by admin  
Filed under New, Thoughts

milky-wayFrom time to time, various magazines and television channels tackle the perennial question, “Who is God?”.   Much space is devoted to  personal views of a cross-section of people concerning who, or what, God might be.  Well-known personalities are interviewed as well as other lesser-known people from around the world, including professed Christians of different varieties, Muslims, Hindus, Jews, Mormons, agnostics and free thinkers.

As a student of world religion and Christian leader I find such inquiries to be intensely fascinating because they give us the pulse of what people are thinking in our wider world.  For example, a Hindu beggar from Benares, India, reverences a variety of deities and wonders why he has been stricken with leprosy.  He suggests that it may be because he is being punished by Brahma for bad karma in previous lives.
A California woman was raised in an Orthodox synagogue but says she can’t connect with God or with being Jewish anymore.  The idea of God as she has understood it simply doesn’t connect in her life experience.  A British biologist views God as the “ultimate reality” and believes that the destiny of individuals is to be absorbed into this supreme truth.
A Columbian hit man describes life as a dark experience in which God makes each person pay for the evil they commit.  Yet he goes on to say , “God pardons everyone who seeks him, so pretty much you can do what you want.”
A Presbyterian minister defends his gay lifestyle by saying, “God loves you just the way you are”.  He blames strong feelings against homosexuals on traditional religion.
A Palestinian sheikh views Allah as a vengeful God, and boasts of his willingness to die in holy war.

These views of God are indeed fascinating.  Yet even so, they ought to prod our thinking a bit.  Given the fact that people have an almost endless variety of opinions about what God is, it certainly does not follow that every opinion is equally valid.  We Americans cherish our religious freedom.  However, simply because people are free under the law to practice religion as conscience may dictate, this does not mean that all religions are equally true, or even equally beneficial.

This brings up the question, “How can we sort through the menu of religious ideas and recognize the truth when we stumble across it?”  The Bible’s answer to this is simply that the whole question of religious opinion is  irrelevant.  It is not what we think about God that really matters, but what God has revealed about Himself to us that counts.

To this many people say, “Wait!”  Who says the Bible’s portrayal of God is any better than the views of an Indian peasant or a Hollywood producer?”  This is an excellent question.  If what the Bible says about God is simply just another human opinion, then Christianity (and the ancient religion of Israel for that matter) crumbles like a house with no foundation.

So let’s narrow the field a bit.  The Bible does not belong alongside the religious opinions of ordinary people simply because the Bible claims to be divinely inspired.  It claims to be God’s word as revealed through the prophets and apostles.  There is a quantum difference between what your neighbor thinks about God, and an ancient and widely revered document that claims divine inspiration.

What about the other books which share this claim?  Many Christians answer this by pointing to the need to simply have faith in the Bible.  While it is true that faith is necessary, it would be wrong to assume that there is no evidence for the Bible’s final authority.  Consider these bits of evidence for the Bible’s unique inspiration:  the amazing unity of its message, though written over a span of roughly 1500 years through more than 40 human authors; its triumph time and again over those who actively sought its destruction; the dozens of literally fulfilled prophecies; the impact it has had on millions of lives.

Also consider the historical fact of the physical resurrection of Jesus Christ.  I understand that many people consider this to be a matter for faith as well.  This is true, but not without some evidence.  A major piece of this evidence is the ease with which those who wished to stop the rumor could have disproved it by opening the grave and displaying the body.  They didn’t.  Why would hundreds die willingly, knowing that the resurrection which they claimed to witness was a lie?  Indeed, the Resurrection is the foundational fact on which the Christian gospel was and still is based.

So there is compelling evidence for the authority of the Bible in what it says about God.  It proclaims Him to be the Eternal One:  Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  It shows Him to be holy, yet also merciful in sending His Son Jesus to die for our sins.  It invites us to know Him through Christ and become His children.  This, and much more God has revealed.  Why settle for mere opinions?

Michael Bogart